TMB Super Monocentric 6mm


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Brand and Model:TMB Super Monocentric 6mm
Price ($USD):$200.00
Type:Monocentric
Focal Length:6 mm
Barrel Size:1.25
Apparent FOV:30.0 degrees
Field Stop Dia.:0.0 mm
Eye Relief:4 mm
Elements:3
Weight (lbs):
Description:For medium high power observing within the solar system, this 1.25" Super Monocentric TMB eyepiece is nothing short of outstanding. It works particularly well with refractors to provide unequalled lunar, planetary, and binary star views. High quality and accurately collimated equatorial reflectors with focal ratios of f/6 and above will also work well. The better-quality 7” aperture and larger Schmidt- and Maksutov-Cassegrains will also work well, although their focal lengths will provide narrow fields and very high magnifications that will require exceptional seeing to fully utilize. It will also resolve compact globular clusters in exquisite detail, if the field of your eyepiece/telescope combination is wide enough to hold them. With a relatively narrow 30° field of view, it is not designed to encompass open clusters or large scale faint objects (even on a 540mm focal length instrument its field of view is only a third of a degree across). However, its unsurpassed 99% light transmission makes it surprisingly good for picking out faint and compact planetary nebulas against a stellar background. That said, the buyer should still recognize that this eyepiece is optimized for the highest possible contrast and highest definition lunar and planetary images, not deep space observing. It will reward the serious lunar/planetary observer with the best images that his or her telescope and skies are capable of producing. The highest quality and best maintained optics will benefit most from this eyepiece.

Vote Highlights Vote
TMB Super Monocentric 6mm
Ah, the poor, misunderstood monocentric design. If you add up all the reviews on these eyepieces, both here as well as on other forums, you are bound to get quite a confusing mixture of both praise and problems. I'm not sure if it's the hype or the fact that the average amateur astronomer has a number of wider and more comfortable eyepieces to choose from than ever before, but I suspect most of the negatives you read about is due to the reviewer being unprepared for the unique nature of these eyepieces. Monocentrics are not new, but they've been out of circulation for a number of years, (my pardon to ITE who do offer mono's, but they are relatively unknown), so when your average amateur hears, "best planetary" they might be thinking some sort of high-end ortho. Nope. The design approach for mono's is quite different than either ortho's or plossl's. Forget wide field, forget flat field, forget eye relief. Mono's were designed to provide the sharpest, contastiest and brightest on-axis image of any eyepiece, period. The key distinction is the phrase, "on-axis". Don't compromise the on-axis image in any way with concerns about comfort or FOV. Put as few pieces of glass or other distractions between the viewer and the image. The cemented 3 element design acts as a single element which means just 2 air to glass surfaces to scatter light. A few folks bring up Kelner's which are also 3 element eyepiece's. But the most obvious difference between Kelner's and mono's is the Kelner has a group of 2 lens elements and a single element, or 4 air to glass surfaces. Twice the surface area to bounce light as the mono.

So where's the review? I just had to intro with that because people need to understand when I give a "10" for optics it has nothing to do with comfort or FOV. On-axis, this is the cleanest, sharpest eyepiece I've ever looked through. Period. I own or have owned, Pentax ortho's, Tak LE's, AP Superplanetaries as well as UO ortho's, etc. and to an eyepiece, the TMB is the best on-axis. In my 4 inch, F8 apo, it is sharp right to the edge of it's 30* AFOV. In my 3.1 inch, F6 achro it does start to soften a little at the edge, but 75% of the FOV is sharp. I have a 12.5 inch, F5 newt on order, but even though I haven't had a chance to use it yet in that, I can pretty well predict how it will do. I'll bet on-axis nothing can touch it. Off-axis it will soften even a little earlier than the F6 achro, maybe at 65% before it softens some.

So that's it. TMB has introduced a simply marvelous planetary and double star eyepiece. If you are an experienced planetary or double star observer you will appreciate someone has heard your request for simplicity and rewards you with stunning performance. It's probably not for the casual observer, but I give it the highest recommendation otherwise.

One final comment. With the narrow 30* AFOV the eye relief actually feels longer. At this focal length you literally have to lay your eyeball on the field lens of a 50* AFOV plossl, but can sit back rather comfortably with a 30* mono.

Thanks for putting up with my opinions,
Mike

Overall Rating: 10
Optics:10 Value:9
Weight: 6 (Veritable Vote)
Date:
By: Anonymous (xxx.xxx.42.10)
Link to this vote: http://excelsis.com/1.0/displayvote.php?voteid=408410


TMB Super Monocentric 6mm
My favorite higher power eyepiece in my TOA 130. With this EP I am able to easily resolve Castor , see Cassini's division clearly (when seeing permits) , and obtain beautiful views of many close double stars. Much sharper and brighter than my 5 mm Radian despite the slightly lower magnification.

Overall Rating: 10
Optics:10 Value:10
Weight: 6 (Veritable Vote)
Date:
By: rodgerraubach
Link to this vote: http://excelsis.com/1.0/displayvote.php?voteid=332277


TMB Super Monocentric 6mm
A great eyepiece for planets. Sharp high contrast images. Build quality is also quite nice.

Overall Rating: 10
Optics:10 Value:10
Weight: 5 (Veritable Vote)
Date:
By: msholden
Link to this vote: http://excelsis.com/1.0/displayvote.php?voteid=484442


TMB Super Monocentric 6mm
The TMB Monocentric eyepieces (and the 6mm I am reporting on here) are simply the best planetary eyepieces I have ever used.

Positives:

The TMB is critically sharp across the field, and the optical design coupled with the best possible polish and coatings yield the darkest backgrounds I have ever seen in an eyepiece.

Cautions:

The Monocentrics have a relatively narrow field. For their intended purpose, this factor doesn't bother me. When viewing the planets (these ARE planetary eyepieces) I don't use the edges of the field anyway, so I simply position my eye at a comfortable distance from the eyepiece. The background is so dark it is not troubling to me that the field is narrow; I can hardly notice WHERE the field boundary is.

On nights of truly superb seeing, I use this eyepiece with the TMB 1.8 Barlow to get a bit more magnification with my Tak FS-152 than the 4mm eyepiece provides. On nights of less than perfect seeing, the 5mm or 6mm may be the highest power I can use.

Cons:

I seen NO downside to this eyepiece optically or mechanically when it is used for its intended purpose.

Cosmetically I found it difficult to read the focal length (on a band around the top of the barrel) at night.

Overall impression:

I know of no better planetary eyepieces. Period. Thus my optical rating of 10. When you look at the cost of other premium eyepieces (Televue, Pentax, Takahashi etc.) or the used price of a Zeiss Monocentric or Abbe Orthoscopic, I believe the TMB's are a true bargain. Thus my value rating of 10.

Please see additional comments in my 4mm review that generally also apply to the 6mm eyepiece.

Richard Chalfan

Overall Rating: 10
Optics:10 Value:10
Weight: 3 (Unreliable Vote)
Date:
By: Anonymous (xxx.xxx.44.3)
Link to this vote: http://excelsis.com/1.0/displayvote.php?voteid=405815


TMB Super Monocentric 6mm
I use the 6mm TMB on my 6" achromatic refractor. The best thing about it is the lack of ghosting and "sweet spot". Planetary images are equally sharp across the entire field of view, so it doesn't matter whether you are at the edge or in the center. The smaller FOV is irrelevant if you have a clock drive, and still doable if you don't, because you can position the image anywhere in the field. No abberations whatsoever in this eyepiece, which is important if you are using a Chinese refractor. I find I can get by without using my v-minus filter using this eyepiece, and it gives 200 x @ F/8 which is good power under most atmospheric conditions; so it is a workhorse for me. A think it is a good value, considering the price of multi-element wide fields, which don't perform as well.

Overall Rating: 10
Optics:10 Value:10
Weight: 3 (Unreliable Vote)
Date:
By: Anonymous (xxx.xxx.66.25)
Link to this vote: http://excelsis.com/1.0/displayvote.php?voteid=347300


TMB Super Monocentric 6mm
Fabulous planetary performance. I am using 2 in a TV Binovue

Overall Rating: 10
Optics:10 Value:10
Weight: 3 (Unreliable Vote)
Date:
By: Anonymous (xxx.xxx.117.208)
Link to this vote: http://excelsis.com/1.0/displayvote.php?voteid=317677


TMB Super Monocentric 6mm
These eyepieces are well overrated. The reason? - an eyerelief and FOV are too small. Really, too small for comfortable observing which is very important for planetary observing.
What one can expect from the design, which is more than 100 year old?

Overall Rating: 5
Optics:7 Value:5
Weight: 1 (Unreliable Vote)
Date:
By: Anonymous (xxx.xxx.222.34)
Link to this vote: http://excelsis.com/1.0/displayvote.php?voteid=368666


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